Professor Cartwright

Today, jc-tv1February 29, 2016, Professor Cartwright officially begins her journey as a college professor at Southeastern College in West Palm Beach, Florida, teaching Speech Communications or The Art of Public Speaking.

Having been a professional performer for over 40 years, Professor Cartwright has presented papers at several conferences on women’s music and the history of Jazz and Blues. She has toured in 19 countries as a vocalist and published 11 books.

Once her doctoral dissertation Women in Jazz: Music Publishing and Marketing is completed and accepted by Northcentral University, Professor Cartwright plans to continue lecturing and teaching business courses at various institutions. Her expected date of graduation is January 2017. Until that time, she will teach at SEC during the months of March, July, and November.

Visit her websites:

New Horizon!

newhorizon2

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Conscious Inclusion of Women Musicians

This is an important issue but too many women are totally unaware of the problem. What do you know about women musicians and the inequity of income they earn compared to what male musicians earn?

Published at Versita: Conscious Inclusion of Women Musicians

Dr. Diva JC - Scholar . Teacher . Author

[THIS PAPER IS PUBLISHED at Versita]

The paper was presented at the British and American Studies Conference, in 2012, and is posted on the website of Fondazione Adkins-Chiti: Donne in Musica

Conscious Inclusion of Women Musicians
By Joan Cartwright, M.A.

Music, the sound of the spheres, begins in the womb! ~ Diva JC

Abstract
This paper discusses the vast divide between performance opportunities and income earned by male and female musicians. Although female singers are quite visible on the world’s stages, few female instrumentalists are employed on a regular basis and even fewer women composers have their music commissioned for programs or films funded by private and public monies. Several proficient female jazz musicians are identified, and how and why women are omitted from performance is discussed. The need for everyone – producers, promoters, funders, and bandleaders – to consciously choose to include women musicians in programming…

View original post 3,323 more words

2014 Update

Near the end of my 11th Doctoral course for Business Marketing, I am closer to graduation than ever before. As I look back over the past two years, much progress has been made.  I’m not situated in Atlanta, GA, where I live with my daughter, Mimi Johnson, CEO of www.mjtvnetwork.info, which has several shows in production. On May 21, I will co-host one of three shows in a series entitled Amazing Musicwomen with vocal musician Sandi Blair.

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Meanwhile, we are calling for a Symposium on Women in Arts.  Please LIKE this page at Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/symposiumonwomeninarts) and sign and share this petition: http://tinyurl.com/ks5byvs

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On May 2, at the Ferst Center in Atlanta, GA, I will be named the first

Lady Jazz Master by Black Women in Jazz & Fine Arts Awards among other astute women in music.

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Finally, we encourage everyone to nominate a woman musician/composer for the prestigious NEA Jazz Master Award for 2015. You can do this at http://arts.gov/honors/jazz

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Visit my website at www.joancartwright.com 

Blues Women: First Civil Rights Workers

Blues Women: First Civil Rights Workers
©2014 Joan Cartwright, M.A.

amazing_musicwomen_hardcoverThe African voice inspired instrumentalists. Vocalese was a dialogue between vocalists and instrumentalists. Each person had an individual sound and instrumentalists imitated the voice’s cries, growls, moans, slurs, whispers, shouts and wails. Blues was the element of American subculture created by enslaved Africans, singing European music. Considered crude by classical listeners, Blues liberated singers from precise pitch and calculated rhythms of European music. Black singers emerged from Spirituals and Blues to develop Jazz. Their free-spirited songs delivered messages of liberation, signaling to Africans in America that they could be free. Blues women were the first civil rights workers because their songs symbolized liberty in its rawest form by tapping into the human spirit. Angela Davis recounted Marx and Engles’ observation that art as “a form of social consciousness [awakens] . . . those affected by it to . . . transform their oppressive environments” (Davis, 1999). Blues were popularized by Gertrude “Ma” Rainey (Columbus, GA, September, 1882 – December 22, 1939), The Mother of the Blues (Cartwright, 2008, p. 9). A spokesperson for black people, she was a hero to them. She recorded hundreds of songs on Paramount, putting that recording company on the map. The most popular Blues singers established a rapport and rhetoric with the crowd. Ma Rainey took Bessie Smith under her wing and Blues tradition developed as one followed another.
a history of AA jazz bluesReferences
Cartwright, J. (2009). A history of African American jazz and blues.  FYI Communications, Inc.
Cartwright, J. (2008). Amazing Musicwomen. FYI Communications, Inc.
Davis, A.Y. (1999). Blues legacies and black feminism. New York: Random House.