Keynote Speaker

In partnership with Jazz Heritage Wales, the University of Wales Trinity Saint David (UWTSD) will host the fourth Documenting Jazz Conference from 9 to 12 November in Swansea, supported by the Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama (RWCMD) and Brecon Jazz. 

The conference will be held at the Dylan Thomas Centre, Swansea, and will focus on the theme of diversity and aims to create an interdisciplinary forum which is both inclusive and wide-ranging for sharpening awareness, sharing studies and experiences, and focusing the debate on distinct aspects of diversity in jazz today. http://documentingjazz.com

Joan Cartwright presented on Thursday, November 10 @ 11 a.m. EST

If you missed my speech, read the paper I wrote.

Keynote: Who gives voice to diversity in jazz?

Dr Joan Cartwright is a renowned veteran of the Jazz and Blues stage for 40+ years. She is a vocalist, composer, and author of several books, including her memoir with touring and teaching experiences, and was honored as the first Lady Jazz Master by Black Women in Jazz Awards in Atlanta, GA, in 2014. Her titles include Amazing MusicwomenSo You Want To Be A Singer? and A History of African American Jazz and Blues with interviews of Quincy Jones, Dewey Redman, Lester Bowie, among other jazz musicians and aficionados. Books are available at http://lulu.com/spotlight/divajc

In 2007, she founded Women in Jazz South Florida, Inc., a non-profit organization to promote women musicians. In 2022, the organization released its 8th CD of women composers. Dr Cartwright hosts MUSICWOMAN Radio, featuring women who compose and perform their own music at BlogTalkRadio, has two personal CDs Feelin’ Good and In Pursuit of a Melody, and featured as an actor in Last Man and The Siblings, two sitcoms produced by MJTV Network. In June 2022, she decide to incorporate Musicwoman Archive and Cultural Center in North Carolina to preserve the music of women composers and instrumentalists.

Cartwright is the editor of Musicwoman Magazine and Musicman Magazine.

Read her paper: https://drdivajc.com/2022/11/10/who-gives-voice-to-jazz

Francesco Martinelli

(Re)examining diversity throughout the jazz historiography

Francesco Martinelli is a jazz promoter, journalist, lecturer, translator and author. He is the author of magazine articles and monographs about Evan Parker, Joëlle Léandre and Mario Schiano. Since 1999 he has taught the history of jazz and related subjects at the Siena Jazz Foundation courses and in other conservatories in Italy. Martinelli has lectured at NYU, Wesleyan and Columbia Universities in the USA, at Bilgi and ITU in Istanbul, at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique et de Danse de Paris, and many other institutions. His primary research interests include the history of jazz in Italy, jazz relationships with visual arts, traditional musics from the Near East, discography, and the preservation and restoration of sound carriers.

Martinelli is currently a consultant for the Izmir European Jazz Festival and Director of the Arrigo Polillo Center for Jazz Studies in Siena, Italy’s most important jazz archive. He has translated over 10 reference jazz books into Italian and is a contributor to Rough Guide to Turkish Music and recently edited The History of European Jazz The Music, Musicians and Audience in Context (Equinox, 2018).

Read Cartwright’s paper: https://drdivajc.com/2022/11/10/who-gives-voice-to-jazz

I’m Impressed

I’m impressed! My dissertation has been annotated by Justin Rogers

https://core.ac.uk/download/477685476.pdf

Cartwright, Joan. “Women in Jazz: Music Publishing and Marketing.” DBA diss., Northcentral University, 2017.

This dissertation by Joan Cartwright explores, through a case study, the business practices of a select group of twenty women in the jazz industry. The dissertation is broken into five primary sections: an overview of the mechanics and background associated with the case study, a literature review encompassing the general mechanics of the jazz industry, her research method, the findings of the case study, and further implications of the results found in the study. Its relevance to potential applications for a centralized marketplace is primarily present through the literature review Cartwright includes in the dissertation. This section explores differences in business models, pricings, branding, and distribution. Although much of Cartwright’s dissertation strays away from asserting a centralized publishing marketplace, her analysis of business models in the jazz industry is still relevant to the area, and provides critical insight. Cartwright’s need for a full analysis of different aspects in the jazz business model is central to her dissertation with regard to her advocacy for an even playing field between male and female jazz musicians. As a result, this analysis is unparalleled with other sources in this list.

Available at Lulu.com

Academia.com

This qualitative case study explored women jazz musicians and earning as music publishers. It examined business practices of 20 women in jazz in the U.S., between 30 and 64, who compose and publish jazz mu-sic. Variables were education, number of songs composed, incorporation, affiliation with royalty organiza-tions, and how they used marketing, branding, promotion, and advertisement. Participants discussed finan-cial challenges resulting from gender and age discrimination. Focus was on business tactics for operations and marketing that affected the professional careers of women jazz musicians. Best business practices were explored for women musicians in jazz and guidelines for young women entering the industry. Suggestions were made for how private corporations and governments could be more inclusive of women’s music through programming and grant-making, and recommendations for future research and policy for equitable treatment of women musicians, particularly in media and film.

The Art of Resiliency: Phoenixes Rising

It is one thing to read about resilience and people who overcome the hard knocks of life, time and time, again. It is encouraging to know that you can be mentored by someone to lift yourself out of the muck and mire of life. But to have my story included in this phenomenal anthology is beyond motivational for me. Dr. Joy Vaughan has risen to a new height by offering her story of worldwide travel coupled with the stories of accomplished women in the countries where she journeyed. Joy’s book is a testament of the personal power that determined women use to accomplish everything they intend to manifest.

Bridging the Gap

In 2021, there are bridges to gap!

There is the gap between generations.

There is the gap between men and women.

There is the gap between the church and state.

There is the gap between the academy and the community.

There is the gap between the haves and have nots on so many levels.

There is the gap between the brick wall or the glass ceiling and success.

There is the gap between the cultured and the uncultured, whatever that may mean.

Autumn Update

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This summer was brutal in so many ways. The heat in South Florida was severe. Hurricane Dorian tore up the Bahamas and parts of South Carolina. My summer class was canceled due to low enrollment, leaving me in a financial bind. However, I survived, thanks to friends and family.

Now, I am teaching four classes at Palm Beach State College (PBSC) in The Fundamentals of Speech Communication. Two classes are at the Central Campus in Lake Worth and two are at Palm Beach Gardens. I have over 100 students.

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The first assignment was to write an essay, giving me an opportunity to see how well (or unwell) my students write. They must learn the Rules for Writing in a scholarly manner, which most of them are unfamiliar with.

These are some of the rules for scholarly writing:

  1. Documents are formatted in APA Style.
  2. Your essay is double-spaced and flush with the left margin (1” around).
  3. The font is Times New Roman, 12 pt.
  4. Do not use CAPS or BOLD.
  5. A paragraph contains 3 to 5 sentences.
  6. Write in the past tense with subject/verb agreement.
  7. Do not write run-on sentences or incomplete sentences (phrases without a verb).
  8. Do not start a sentence with a gerund, a verb ending in ‘ing’.
  9. Write simple, active, declarative sentences (Subject, predicate, object, period).
  10. Do not write a question, unless it is a research question. Write simple, active, declarative sentences.
  11. Double quotes are used with direct quotations and require an in-text citation and must be listed in ‘References’ on a separate page.
  12. Use single quotes to emphasize a word or phrase (‘Normal’).
  13. Do not use contractions (don’t = do not; I’ve = I have; I’m = I am; isn’t = is not).
  14. Avoid clutter, using too many words to make a simple statement.
  15. Do not use absolutes: ‘all’, ‘always’, ‘everyone’, ‘never’.
  16. Be careful about putting commas where they belong. Research ‘adverbial phrases’ to see where the comma goes. Commas go before and after an adverbial phrase that answers the question ‘when’, ‘where’, ‘how’, ‘how much’, or ‘how many’.
  17. Do not use slang: A kid is a baby goat. In scholarly writing, use ‘child’ or ‘children’.
  18. An ellipsis (. . .) is only used to omit words from a direct quote.
  19. The word ‘also’ goes at the beginning or end of a sentence. Do not separate a subject from the verb (‘I also study’ should be written ‘Also, I study’ or ‘I study, also’).
  20. Write the word for numbers one through nine. You may use 10, 11, 12, etc.
  21. Spell out acronyms the first time you use them, for example, American Psychological Association (APA),  Center for Disease Control (CDC); National Football League (NFL).

This term, students wrote an essay, as follows:

TO:      Speech Students
RE:      Watch this video: https://youtu.be/MY5SatbZMAo

Write a 500-word essay answering these questions:

  1. What makes you special?
    1. What is normal?
    2. Do you fit the mold? Why?
  2. What dialogue have you had to make a change?
  3. What is respect?
  4. What do you see when you meet someone?
    1. What do you have in common?
    2. Do you see a human being?
  5. What unexpected event made you reimagine yourself, your dream, your goals?
    1. Did your self-determination increase?
    2. Were you more self-motivated?
    3. Did you discover self-definition?

Be humanists. Celebrate our differences!

The best response to the question “Do you fit the mold?” is this one:

I believe I fit some molds. I fit the mold as a teenager with big dreams, I fit the mold as a martial artist, I fit the mold as a film enthusiast. Everyone has a mold they fit, most often, it is more than one mold. Even those that are considered special have at least one mold they fit.

 

I am enjoying this experience because I love seeing the lights go on in my student’s eyes. I love it when they tell me they are learning something new or being reminded of something they learned as a child. Although they are challenged with grammar, sentence structure, clutter, and adverbial phrases that require a comma, their essays give me hope that millennials are more humane than their predecessors.

I am most grateful for Spellcheck in WORD and Grammarly!

Dr. Joan Cartwright