Honors and Progress

Thanks to Howard Mandel and Laurie Dapice for honoring me as a 2019 Jazz Journalist Association (JJA) Jazz Hero.

Thanks to Brian Zimmerman, Digital Editor of Jazziz Magazine for presenting the award. Thanks to Marika Guyton for organizing the award ceremony. Photos: Gregory Reed

Thanks to Old Dillard Foundation for partnering with Women in Jazz South Florida, Inc. for this program

The universe provides. Last week I got the news that the Speech class I taught for 3 years is moving online, leaving me without income in June-July. I cried. I felt helpless. However, as things always go, I have the opportunity to teach 3 classes at PBSC in Palm Beach Gardens, starting May 15, through the summer.

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www.wijsf.org

 

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JJA Jazz Hero

The Jazz Journalists Association is pleased to announce the 2019 Jazz HeroesAdvocates, altruists, activists, aiders, and abettors of jazz who have had a significant impact in their local communities. The ‘Jazz Hero’ awards, made annually on the basis of nominations from community members, are presented by their local fans and friends in conjunction with the JJA’s annual Jazz Awards honoring significant achievements in jazz music and journalism. Please spread the word of Jazz Heroes you know as neighbors and admire, via your own social media posts. See all JJA Jazz Awards for 2019 Jazz Heroes

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Dr. Joan Cartwright

2019 South Florida Jazz Hero

Dr. Joan Cartwright is a professor of Speech Communication at Southeastern College in West Palm Beach, Florida and in 2017 completed her Doctorate in Business Administration/ Marketing (DBA) at Northcentral University in Arizona, but it’s for her writing, composing, lecturing, producing, research and documentation concerning women composers (especially) in jazz and blues, and for her founding in 2007 of the non-profit Women In Jazz South Florida, Inc., that the Jazz Journalists Association hails her as 2019 South Florida Jazz Hero.

Dr. Cartwright is clearly a person of many parts and high energy. In the 12 years of its existence, WIJSF has released six compilation albums, comprising 63 songs from 45 women composers. Since 2008, she has hosted 300 episodes on MUSICWOMAN Radio, published four Catalogs of Women in Arts & Business and Musicwoman Magazine’s premier edition. She has published 14 books with her own FYI Communications, Inc. on lulu.com. She is an ASCAP-affiliated publisher and songwriter, a member of National League of American Pen Women, and through WIJSF maintains international relations with diverse peer groups. She blogs and has contributed to the South Florida TimesIn Focus MagazineGlobal Woman Magazine and Encyclopedia of the African Diaspora. She has an impressive array of academic accreditations and has been honored by several professional associations. But one senses that the devotion of her WIJSF members, and the continuous support of her daughter Mimi Johnson, with whom she owns  MJTV Network (“Positive Influential Television”), is based on personal qualities that imbue her larger projects.

Among those is a goal to build the Musicwoman Archive to house the musical and literary works of women musicians and provide performance and educational center where women musicians can thrive. In educational workshops Dr. Cartwright presents, which highlight the pitfalls and benefits of the music business, she insists that “Knowing music theory is a step in the right direction for any singer who truly wants to excel in the world of music!” Yet her own breadth of endeavors — acting, singing, media creation, marketing, advertising, public speaking, and public relations skills as well as command of theory are arrows in her quiver — attests to the reach she models for all women, all artists, anyone whose ambitions extend to being creative, innovative, expressive, self-realized, in the moment while communing with others, sharing experience, telling truth, seeking  beauty — in other words, living as a Jazz Hero. ~ Howard Mandel

 

Dr. Cartwright will receive her JJA Jazz Heroes Award on April 25, 2019 at this event

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A New Friend

While in Florida, I sought out Joan Cartwright. She interviewed me on her podcast www.blogtalkradio.com/musicwoman in 2014 and 2018. She is the founder and executive director of Women in Jazz of South Florida. I wanted to meet the Woman behind the Mic who was supporting women in jazz. As the day unfolded, I was enriched and enlightened. Evolved!

Joan has traveled the world as a vocalist, musician, composer, and author of several books. I was lucky enough for two of them to land in my lap. She gives lectures, worldwide, and has earned the highest education in Music, Communication, and Business Marketing. She hosted a trip through Boynton Beach and took me to her home and prepared lunch for me!

She asked me if I would like a reading and, now, I am glad I said yes. It was about me standing in the white light, even in song, residing there in the blue center of the white light. I was blown away. Then, she asked me if I was ready to become a member. I figured she earned that. She has worked very hard to support Women in Jazz and was the very light that she read about in that reading. It was so beautiful I am going to transcribe it. I am officially a member of Women in Jazz of South Florida. Please check out wijsf.org to become a member.

Also, check out her book Amazing Musicwomen. I was in need of inspiration and what they say is true! “If you’re in need of something and remain open to it, Divine Order will place it right in front of you. She is the kind of woman I could learn a lot from, having traveled the same journey as I am traveling. She has achieved a higher consciousness and superlative light!

Joan, thank you for your books, wisdom, and inspiration. ~ Laurie Dapice

I encourage others to seek her and WIJSF out as well as her radio show. The force of Women in Jazz is dynamic and you should be eager to be a part of something much bigger than you  🌴 Here is Joan singing:

 

DrDivaJC in China

China called Dr. Joan Cartwright to teach Speech Communication at Shanghai Second Polytechnic University (SSPU) from December 10, 2018, to January 4, 2019. The 24-hour journey to Pudong Airport in Shanghai went without a hitch.

Dr. Cartwright had 59 Chinese students who learned public speaking. Dr. Cartwright has taught Speech for three years at Southeastern College in West Palm Beach and Keiser University in Pembroke Pines, Florida.

This opportunity to teach in China arose through Broward College that is affiliated with nine countries: China, India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru, and Spain. This is a very exciting opportunity for Dr. Cartwright. She spent five months in China in 2006, singing at CJW Club. Teaching there was a new experience!

Upon her return, Dr. Cartwright has reflected on this one-month experience from December 10 to January 4. First, the campus is a high-tech environment with thousands of students.

Building 19, where us professors lived, is a hospitality training center affiliated with Intercontinental Hotel. Our rooms were beautiful and the restaurant where we ate Monday through Friday was lovely and offered delicious Chinese cuisine.

The classrooms in the adjoining building were large and airy but really too cold for this time of year.

During the week and on the weekends, we had a large shopping mall across the street where we could buy groceries at the Carrefour and dine at several restaurants.

The students were very respectful. However, it took two weeks to get them to speak up as most students believed that their responsibility was only to listen to what the professor said and to take notes. Speech Communication requires a lot of vocal feedback and Dr. Cartwright managed to get most of her students to respond by the third week. In the fourth week, every student had to speak as part of a team of five students on the topic the team chose. All of the speeches were interesting and well-researched. The first class 16 SCM (Supply Chain Management) had 25 students. They were very bright and a lot of fun. Although learning APA Style to format scholarly writing can be difficult, they toed the line and did the work!

The second class with 34 students was 16 WD (Internet Technology). There were only eight girls in this class. The boys were slightly reticent, at first, but they all came out shining with their speeches.

During the last week, we were happy to have a Toastmaster from Pudong visit our classes and evaluate some of our speeches. His name is Yezhe Zheng from the Mandarin-English club in Pudong, Shanghai, China. His input was invaluable for the students because he spoke to them in English and Mandarin about how they could improve their speaking skills.

Of course, like all teachers, Dr. Cartwright had her favorite students. Most were those who spoke up in class or helped to keep the class organized and informed.

Joan was so fortunate to have friends in Shanghai who took her out on the weekends. They were Richard, Daphne, and Tony Wu, Erin Peng, and Matthew Magers.

The real upside of this adventure were colleagues from Broward College, Dr. Tai Houser, Dr. Tuly Badillo, and Nicolae __________, with whom she had many laughs.

Since it was the holiday season, there were many opportunities for shopping and dining out in Shanghai. Erin, Joan, and her visitor for the last week Glenda McQueen visited Jing’ An Temple, Century Mall, and Xintiandi, where they had great meals

At the end, the students admitted that they learned a lot. Some of them gave Dr. Cartwright lovely gifts that she will have to remember them by.

Most memorable was the food and dining experience!


P.S. Today, this was my response to a question on Quora.com: What are the advantages of communication and its environment?

Joan Cartwright, Master of Arts Communication, Florida Atlantic University (1994)
For me, the advantage is that I am one of a handful of Speech Communication professors in the country and the world. In the few years I’ve been teaching, I’ve learned a lot about human intrapersonal and interpersonal communication. I’ve learned that each person in the world has a particular perspective and most do not see eye-to-eye. I’ve learned that social media has opened up the world to billions. However, in first-world countries like the USA, young people have stopped talking to each other and their elders, in lieu of messaging, using acronyms and emoticons. Therefore, their communications skills have become stunted.

Will this phenomenon level out before the next generation loses their command of language and social exchange?

I’m not sure about that. What I teach my students is critical thinking and critical listening, which encourages them to put the phones away and pay attention to what is going on around them, including what is being said by their parents, siblings, children, and friends.

 

Adjuncting

In July 2017, I graduated with my Doctorate in Business Administration/Marketing. I was so sure I would be teaching my discipline at a college or university. But here I am, nine months later, and I’m still only teaching Speech/Public Speaking. Even though I teach at three different schools, adjuncting is not secure income because most classes run four to six weeks every three to four months. So, there is a lull between classes, making me feel very uneasy.

From January through February 2018, I drove 300 miles per week to teach at two schools in Miami Lakes and Pembroke Pines. I earned good money but my body suffered tremendously. My right foot began to pain me around the sixth week of driving and, now, two months later, I can barely walk.

However, I am fortunate to be teaching online, finally. But online teaching pays $1,000 less than teaching in the classroom. Of course, I get to stay home and not pay for gas to run up and down I-95. I need at least two online classes per month to sustain myself, financially.

This article, Instead of Gaslighting Adjuncts, We Could Help Them, motivated me to write this blog post. I have submitted so many job applications to colleges and universities that I lost count! Now, I’m looking at editing positions because I am really good with APA Style since I teach it to my Speech Communication students.

My concern is that I suffer from ageism. I studied for my DBA from the age of 63 to 69. Now, at 70, I fear that no one is willing to hire me for a permanent teaching position. What to do?

I enjoy teaching. I like the variety of teaching at different schools which breaks the monotony of a full-time job in one school or company. But the stress of not knowing whether I’ll be teaching next month is mounting and my blood pressure is rising.

Nothing seems to be working – LinkedIn, Indeed, HigherEdJobs, Glassdoor, ZipRecruiter, EducationJobsite – none of these sites have produced even one interview.  And I’ve been submitting applications for well over a year. What is the answer?

After publishing 14 books, you would think I’d be in demand as a speaker. But the phone is not ringing and no email invitations are forthcoming. My hope is that I will get another online class or two to teach to keep me financially solvent.

I have faith in my abilities to teach. My students (well over 100) confirmed that I know my subject – Public Speaking – and they thanked me for helping them learn a lot about writing, outlining, and APA Style. Most college students are required to take Public Speaking during their general education experience. So, I am in demand since there are not a lot of Speech instructors from what I can gather. That is the upside!

Hence, I am writing this blog with the hopes that someone out there will read it and refer me to someone out there looking for a professor. This is my LinkedIn account. My cover letter, resume, and CV are available upon request to profjoancartwright@gmail.com.

I appreciate any help anyone in this universe can offer.

Sincerely,

Dr. Joan Cartwright

 

My 14th Book

blueswomenRecently, I published my 14th book, Blues Women: The First Civil Rights Workers. Although it is a tiny book, it is packed with information about 10 powerful women who brought the Blues genre to the attention of millions of Americans. At a time when Africans in America were subjected to Jim Crow laws that further degraded their existence, women like Mamie Smith, Gertrude “Ma” Rainey, and Bessie Smith stood their ground on stages across the nation, bringing joy and entertainment to thousands of people, white and black. Their songs are current, today, and their message of the upliftment of the human spirit helped to raise the consciousness of a nation that was built on the backs of their ancestors.

Buy this book at www.lulu.com/shop/dr-joan-cartwright/blues-women-the-first-civil-rights-workers/paperback/product-23486947.html

Celebrate!

In 2017, Dr. Diva JC accomplished four milestones:

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